• Hand Crafted Fair Trade Fabrics

ETHICAL CHRISTMAS GIFT IDEAS

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--- UP TO 60% OFF IN OUR BLACK FRIDAY TO CYBER MONDAY SALE ---

- Welcome To The House of Eunice -

Authentically Fairtrade

The House of Eunice is a Slow Fashion Brand, who's aim is to share our love for beautiful fabrics with the world.

We love craft and support community and family life by commissioning fabrics where craft is under pressure or in decline.
This also ensures no-one is exploited in the making of our products.

MORE ABOUT US...

Meet Our Artisans

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Read Our Top Stories

Tussah silk - why is it called a non - violent silk?

Tussah silk - why is it called a non - violent silk?

 The Indian Tussah Silk moth (Antherea myllita): was traditionally reeled from cocoons collected from the wild but the yields were poor. Tassah silk production underwent a revival with better training for rearers, reelers and weavers provided by PRADAN, an Indian NGO. They improved the supply with disease free eggs and provided training on silkworm rearing. They also planted and pruned food trees for the caterpillars on privately-owned lands and kept the caterpillars on trees protected under netting. The Tussah moth is one of the only moth who exit its cocoon by pushing its way out of the top without breaking the single thread that made the cocoon. It is for this reason that rearer's would wait until the moth hatched before they gathered in the harvest of tussah silk cocoons. The tussah moth does not come to any harm in this process and is able to go on and live its full but short lifecycle. The silk that is then unwound from the cocoon by reelers (pictured) onto purpose made reel's ready for spinning (pictured) and then onto weaving. This form of farming has led to Tussah silk being known as 'non - violent' silk as the caterpillar gets to become a moth and live its full lifecycle. 

Take a look at some of our beautiful Tussah silk shawls in our scarves and shawls section in the online shop.

Who Makes your clothes? - part 1

Who Makes your clothes? - part 1

Have you ever wondered who makes your clothes?
Plus Sizes for Curvy women

Plus Sizes for Curvy women

Enjoy plus sized clothing for the more curvaceous woman.
The Indigo Blues.

The Indigo Blues.

If you love Indigo - this is the process of how it creates that amazing blue...
Yabba Dabu Doo!

Yabba Dabu Doo!

One of my favourite forms of Hand Block printing is Dabu. This is the ancient art of using Mud as a resist to 'block out' or 'resist' the dye when printing.

wooden blocks (usually teak wood) are carved into your design which are then dipped into a bowl of the prepared mud and then placed gently onto the fabric and given a light thump to imprint the design.

The beauty of Dabu is the Mud! Its viscous nature makes the whole printing process so much more fun and the end results more fluid. 

This is repeated over the whole fabric in a pattern repeat. Sawdust is used to sprinkle on top of the mud to hold it in place when dyeing the fabric. the fabric is then placed in the sun to dry. 

Once dry the fabric is ready for its first dip into the indigo pit. This is where the magic happens as the fabric comes out of the dye a beautiful green colour and as it hits the air starts to oxidise and turn blue as the indigo bonds with the fibres. It is then left out in the sun to dry ready for the final washing stage.

Once the mud is finally washed out of the your printed fabric your Dabu resist print is revealed in all its glory....

Cuddles With An Elephant

Cuddles With An Elephant

When travelling to Rajasthan in India, one the must do travel experiences is to go for a ride on an elephant. The small elephant village outside of Jaipur near to the Amber fort in Amer, is where you can meet some of the most affectionate and well-loved elephants you could want to meet.

The dusty road that leads to the elephants takes you off track where the road opens up in to a beautiful dry river bed. You hear the throaty calls of the elephants before you see them. Grinning broadly, you are ushered into meet your ride for the afternoon. Anushka nudges me as I go in for a hug and a photo, she is the mother of the herd and you can feel her affectionate mothering instincts as she patiently waits for you to finish.

Ones dignity goes flying out the window as you attempt to mount your ride and get adjusted to the view from your new height.

It’s one of those joyful experiences that India has to offer, as you gain a beautiful insight into these gentle giants’ mischievous personalities and warm character. I will always remember my first cuddle with an elephant…